Health Care Providers Can Use Design Thinking to Improve Patient Experiences

Harvard Business

Everyone involved had to be on the same page for her to make it to her appointment on time, and coordinating the logistics was onerous and stressful. Mary sought care at a large academic medical center with multiple entrances and towers; at times she was expected to travel long distances due to the sheer size of the facility. Because care is prioritized based on the severity of a patient’s condition, wait times are difficult to predict.

Case Study: Are Our Customer Liaisons Helping or Hurting?

Harvard Business

Exit interviews were usually handled by junior managers on the HR team, but Amrita felt that given the high rate of attrition among doctors at Krisna over the past year, it was her responsibility as head of HR to talk to Dr. Vishnu Patel, a respected cardiologist who’d just given his notice. Despite their hectic schedules, they tried to have lunch at least a few times each month even if it was just a quick cafeteria meal. “Every time I try, you say ‘Give it time.’”

How to Reduce Primary Care Doctors’ Workloads While Improving Care

Harvard Business

There is still a need for accountants and face-to-face meetings, but typically accountants now require such visits for only the more complicated cases that can’t be managed with software or a call. While some aspects of care clearly require doctor and patient to be in the same place at the same time, many demonstrably don’t. The dilation itself takes some time but worse, it leads to a half day of bright lights and blurry vision. Less Time, Better Care.

How Marketers Can Connect Profit and Purpose

Harvard Business

It takes time for a big idea to make its way into business practice. And in 2011, Nathaniel Foote and Russ Eisenstat proposed a “better way to manage in the 21st century.” From digital platforms to customer experience to crisis management , these priorities have been a bellwether for what would soon dominate boardroom discussions and headline business publications. If we do these sub-components, we will transform healthcare.”

Employee Burnout Is a Problem with the Company, Not the Person

Harvard Business

Employee burnout is a common phenomenon, but it is one that companies tend to treat as a talent management or personal issue rather than a broader organizational challenge. The psychological and physical problems of burned-out employees, which cost an estimated $125 billion to $190 billion a year in healthcare spending in the U.S., Projects are time-boxed and focused so that there is more doing and less energy-draining process. Weak time-management disciplines.

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